Promoting quality education for all.

Global Kids Is Helping to Empower Thousands of Youth to Advocate for Change!

Global Kids, 

Global Kids is wrapping up an incredible 2017-2018 academic year in which we worked with over 3000 youth leaders in New York City and Washington, DC! As an organization, we are committed to educating, activating, and inspiring youth from underserved communities to take action on critical issues facing our world today. For nearly 30 years, Global Kids has reached more than 150,000 young people and educators, harnessing and empowering leaders to demonstrate the values and attitudes of global citizens and to make change locally...Global Kids uses an approach to positive youth development that incorporates dynamic, interactive, culturally-relevant and inquiry-oriented workshops that meet young people where they are at and works with them to cultivate their knowledge of domestic and international politics, to strengthen their leadership skills and to increase their civic engagement.  

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From Participation to Agency: Reimagining the Role of Youth for the Future We Want

Building Tomorrow, 

 It is often said that children and youth are the future. They are thought of in terms of their potential—to become the next leaders, peacebuilders, business gurus, and scientists. To realize their potential, quality education is vital, and a considerable amount of attention is given to how to achieve this outcome. With conversations on the topic coming to a fore, the World Bank this year even released its first ever World Development Report devoted entirely to education. The problem, however, is that this mindset often misidentifies youth as mere beneficiaries in the educational system, around which other components must cater and mold themselves, rather than as empowered change makers who play a critical role in shaping that system itself.

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Why youth engagement is the answer to education

Madge Thomas, 

There is no clearer justification for youth engagement than when we consider the challenges facing global education.  Unlike other issues contributing to extreme poverty, like health, famine/hunger and barriers facing girls and women, the education community has not had a ‘spotlight’ moment in the past 10 years and was almost relegated to the ‘decidedly un-sexy’ realm.

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Cross Post from Global Partnership for Education: Youth voices and actions support #RefugeeEducation

Mahmoud Khalil, GPE Youth Advocate, 

“As long as poverty, injustice and gross inequality persist in our world, none of us can rest”, said Nelson Mandela.

I often think about this quote as I reflect upon my life as a Syrian-Palestinian refugee and my work as an education advocate in Lebanon. Many milestones have been reached in global education, including the GPE Financing Conference in Dakar in February, with high level political commitments to education.

But from where I stand, as a young refugee seeking to realize my potential, the fight for education for all the children of the world is an uphill but worthy struggle." ~ Mahmoud Khalil, Youth Advocate for Global Partnership for Education

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Confronting the Challenge at the Intersection of Poverty, Disability and Rurality

Paula J. Beckman and Don Montagna, 

Around the world, there are between 93 to 150 million children with disabilities (UNICEF, 2013).  An estimated 80% of people with disabilities live in low and middle-income countries (Barron & Ncube, 2010) where they are among the most marginalized people in the world - more likely to live in poverty and less likely to be in school (Filmer, 2008; Mitra, et al, 2013).  Many are “invisible,” even to their neighbors, because they do not leave home, receive social services, attend school, or participate in community life.

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Education is a basic human right and often a way out of poverty ~ Rukmini Foundation

Education is a basic human right and often a way out of poverty. Thus, governmental policies and other agencies emphasize access to free or low-cost education. While providing free education is a worthy goal, access alone is not sufficient. What happens when students are too poor to take advantage of it? Can anyone be really too poor to afford “free” education? If such a scenario exists, what does it mean to provide holistic educations for a community? To change the conversation from seemingly distant “future value of education” to immediate “what I will get today,” or more importantly, “why should I go to school today?” We in the Rukmini Foundation realized that we need to think differently and come up with innovative solutions. Through this post, we will summarize our key efforts that shed lights on these vexing questions, which are common to all underdeveloped nations in the world.

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Satisfying girls’ right to education in Tanzania: Re-entry for pregnant girls and young mothers

RESULTS, 

HakiElimu, a Tanzanian CSO working since 2001 to see an open, just, and democratic Tanzania, where all people enjoy the right to education that promotes equity, creativity, and critical thinking, is directing research-based advocacy to support girls’ education. Through the Right to Education Index (RTEI) (www.rtei.org), HakiElimu found that girls’ expulsion from school because of pregnancy is not only legal but also commonplace in Tanzania. 

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Fundraising Ideas for Youth Leaders

Fundraising can be a fun and effective way to raise money for a cause or trip. Throughout life, particularly if you wish to work in the social sector, you will often be in a position where you will need to fundraise to support a cause or an organization. Many large nonprofits have entire divisions dedicated to fundraising. Fundraising is a skill that transfers into many other careers. Fundraising can enhance your financial management, interpersonal skills, commitment, creativity and productivity. While it can be challenging to raise funds, it can also be very rewarding. Fundraising is also a great resume builder.

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