Working toward a quality education for all.



Catalyzing systemic change across Uganda: A BT Fellow’s journey of self-transformation

Access to quality education remains elusive for many across Uganda, particularly in the rural areas where Building Tomorrow (BT) works. The challenges are numerous and far-reaching: teachers are often isolated with little or no access to a network of peers and professional development; community School Management Committees have not been equipped to effectively carry out their responsibilities; local government officers are severely limited in their time and resources and, perhaps most importantly, parents often see little value in investing in a system that is failing their children. Building Tomorrow has been faced with the question of how to simultaneously affect so many diverse issues. We’ve found the answer in a group of ten extraordinary individuals who now make up the Building Tomorrow Fellows.

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Free from violence: Children advocate for safe schools

by Janella Nelson, 

As many children return to school this month, it is an exciting time for parents and students. There is an assumption by many that school is a safe place, but there are children around the world, including in the U.S., that will be returning to school and wondering if their school is really safe. 

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Taking CHARGE through CHATS: A program to reach 12000 girls in secondary school in Malawi

by Kristina Lederer, 

Last September, at the 10th annual Clinton Global Initiative, Advancing Girls’ Education in Africa (AGE Africa) joined a collaboration of 30 civil society organizations, governments, private sector partners, and multilateral organizations in making a historic commitment to improve educational and leadership opportunities for young women and girls. 

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Pushing through the fear to become an advocate

by Hannah Hudson, 

As a girl that called the Alabama suburbs her home, I never dreamed I would find myself in the heart of the most powerful city in the country.Yet, I was pulled to this unfamiliar place in the name of something greater than the wave of inadequacy I felt. The idea of advocating for international education was one that captivated me, and I knew it was something I wanted to experience in a place that has fought for equal rights since it’s founding: Washington, D.C.

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Reversing privatization of education: Case study of Rwanda

by Rukabu Andy Benson, 

After the introduction of nine year basic education in 2007 and 12 year basic education by the government of Rwanda in 2010, many of the private schools have lost the majority of their students. Some of them even ended up closing the doors. Private schools leaders blame these two programs as the main cause for their collapse, but the government did not intend to close private schools. Through its efforts of bringing positive changes in public and government aided schools, they are making public schools more affordable to parents and students which has made it difficult for some private schools to compete. 

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Education Diplomacy: Advancing the Education Sector in a Time of Rapid Change

by ACEI, 

We recognize that 2015 is a particularly transformative year for the global education community as we reflect upon the progress made toward meeting Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals and work to position education as central to the emerging Sustainable Development Goals. During this era of rapid change in education at the global and local levels, it is important to promote approaches and initiatives that advance not only educational equity, access, and quality, but also the education sector as a whole.

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