Promoting quality education for all.

The Power of Exchange Programs

Randal Mason, 

In our increasingly interconnected world, how are American schools preparing youth for successful futures? This was the central theme explored at the 4th annual Global Teaching Dialogue hosted by the U.S. Department of State. Hundreds of participants attended the event, including alumni of U.S. government-sponsored international exchange programs, education champions and experts, and international education organizations.

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Event Summary: Education as the Great Equalizer

Anissa Molloy, 

On Tuesday, September 24, 2019, Oxfam International and GCE-US co-hosted an event on Education as the Great Equalizer during the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

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What We Measure Matters

Amanda Welsh, 
What We Measure Matters

The global indicator for SDG 4.2.1, the goal focused on early childhood, is the “percentage of children under 5 years of age who are developmentally on track in health, learning and psychosocial well-being.”The most recent SDG 4 Data Digest from UNESCO evaluates progress against creating the right measures for this and clearly identifies that we “need a definition of developmentally on track.”

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Teaching in Remote Areas

Educate the Children , 
Teaching in Remote Areas

Teachers in rural Nepal, where Educate the Children works, are disadvantaged in many ways. They are often undereducated themselves. They are usually paid poorly, particularly in public (government) schools. They routinely suffer from lack of adequate classroom furniture and supplies. Most have few or no professional development opportunities, and tend to be isolated from peers other than those at their own schools. 

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Beyond Rote Learning

Educate the Children , 
Beyond Rote Learning

Educate the Children discusses their experience working with Nepal's rural schools to move beyond rote learning by promoting a well-rounded approach to teaching and the overall educational experience for children and teachers of all grade levels from pre-kindergarten through high school.

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From Teacher Training to Teacher Investment

Sarah Bever, 
From Teacher Training to Teacher Investment

The truth is that a highly qualified teacher in a positive school culture can support students to leapfrog grade levels and provide relational and social support. These teachers are invaluable and must be invested in, so that they will continue to grow and will themselves invest in thousands of children throughout their careers.

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Afghanistan’s Uphill Battle for Girls’ Education

by Devon O’Reilly, 

The theme of this year’s 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign was ‘make education safe for all.’ Over the course of the 16 days, Women Thrive Alliance shared the work – campaigns, capacity building techniques, and achievements – of our Alliance members that work relentlessly on gender-based violence that restricts girls from getting an education. Unfortunately, in many instances, female genital mutilation, forced marriage, and rape were the common culprits preventing a girl from continuing her education. In the case of Afghanistan, however, a girl’s mere chance of being allowed any education at all was the baseline.

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Toward Student Centered Learning in the Developing World

by Education Global Access Program, 

A familiar sight: a teacher stands at the head of the classroom with a book or a sheet of paper in hand. Her eyes travel down the page as she reads out loud, pausing every so often to allow the dozens of furiously writing students to catch up. The students will take their notes home for the night. They will study, review, and rehearse until they have memorized word for word the information. And the next morning, one by one, they will stand in front of the teacher and give an oral recitation. The teacher will ask questions. She will write down a final grade. And then she will move on to the next lesson.

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