Promoting quality education for all.

Early Childhood Development -— Supporting Health, Learning, and Growth for All

by Molly Curtiss, 

Early childhood development can sound technical or overly complicated, a jumble of dozens of interventions across all sectors. Really though, it’s quite simple: giving each child all of the things he or she needs to grow up strong and healthy, feel secure, learn and succeed. ECD interventions are critical for ensuring that all children are given a fair start in life and an equal chance to reach their full potential, no matter who they are or where they were born.

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Landline Schools: Balancing Innovations in Educational Quality and Access

by Bradley Broder , 

The remote Kenyan village I called home from 1999-2001 had just one reliable phone line located in a Catholic Church.  The Priest there allowed me to accept incoming calls from my parents in New York every other Sunday at 7 p.m.  If I missed that call, which happened on occasion, two long weeks would pass before that phone would ring again. 

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One Year Later: Why It’s Especially Important to #FundEducation After a Disaster

by Lisa Lyons, 

In April and May 2015, two earthquakes of magnitudes 7.8 and 7.2 respectively devastated much of Nepal. The sudden loss of family members and homes shattered countless people’s lives. The sudden loss of thousands of schools, while understandably not people’s immediate focus of concern, made itself felt as the weeks passed and the desire to get “back to normal” strengthened.

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Why We #FundEducation: Meet AGE Africa Scholar, Cecelia

by Claudia Gonzalez, 

At sixteen years old, Cecelia, a young woman from Chiunda Village in Malawi, has already confronted countless barriers to receiving her education.

As early as primary school, Cecelia remembers watching her friends drop out – a fate that is all too common in the country of Malawi, where less than 6% of women hold a high school diploma. Throughout her adolescence, she has seen firsthand the problems of early marriage. One in every two girls nationwide is married or raising children by the age of 18.

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Realigning Our Priorities – A Focus on Early Childhood

by Molly Curtiss, 

The problem is not just the amount of funding for education, but how the available resources are being spent. In the past decade, tertiary education consistently received the highest proportion of education aid of any education sector, beating out even primary education year after year. Moreover, during this period, seven of the top fifteen donors to education increased the portion of their aid allocated to higher education and consequently decreased the portion to basic education.

Further, this aid to tertiary education isn’t being spent sustainably. A large percentage of growing funds to higher education have been used not to strengthen university systems in recipient countries but rather to provide scholarships for students to attend higher education institutions in donor countries. In 2012, for example, “for every US$1 disbursed in direct aid to early childhood care and education, the equivalent of US$58 went to support students from recipient countries at the post-secondary level in donor countries.”

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Fund education to achieve accessible literacy for all

by Katherine Stephans, 

Can you remember your first day of kindergarten? Or even preschool? Chances are, you were excited beyond words. 

Chances are, your first classroom greeted you with colorful drawings on the walls, 27 letters on the chalkboard, and even a cozy reading corner filled with stacks of books, waiting patiently to take you on an adventure. 

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Education is a lifesaving humanitarian response

by Mark Engman, 

Education is a human right.  More than that, it is a lifesaving humanitarian response.  School provides stability, structure and routine that children need to cope with loss, fear, stress and violence.  Being in school can keep children safe and protected from risks, including gender-based violence, recruitment into armed groups, child labor, and early marriage.  In periods of crisis, parents and children identify education as one of their highest priority needs.

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Wildfire! SDG 4 Red Alert –Rich Profits on Public Education in Liberia

by Jill Christianson, 

There is a wildfire beginning to rage in public education in Liberia.  Without immediate firefighting from many directions, this wildfire could spread elsewhere fast.  Unlike other fires that can be dampened and extinguished quickly, a wildfire  “differs from other fires by its extensive size, the speed at which it can spread out from its original source, its potential to change direction unexpectedly, and its ability to jump” borders.

The first to spot this explosive fire was the National Teachers’ Association of Liberia; it sounded the alarms.   The government of the Republic of Liberia, with leadership of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Minster of Education George Kronnisanyon Werner, has developed the “Partnership Schools for Liberia,” plan for private, for-profit providers to manage all primary schools in the nation by 2020.  

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Barriers to Education for Girls in Haiti

by WomenOne, 

Despite significant progress made in achieving the second Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education, an estimated 63 million adolescents remain out of school. Barriers to education disproportionately affect girls and include poverty, gender-based violence, child marriage, and pregnancy. WomenOne and the Global Campaign for Education-US (GCE-US) are dedicated to ensuring the provision of quality education to all children. Recently, WomenOne focused our efforts on improving quality of education for a small community in rural Haiti. 

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