Promoting quality education for all.

Barriers to Education for Girls in Haiti

by WomenOne, 

Despite significant progress made in achieving the second Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education, an estimated 63 million adolescents remain out of school. Barriers to education disproportionately affect girls and include poverty, gender-based violence, child marriage, and pregnancy. WomenOne and the Global Campaign for Education-US (GCE-US) are dedicated to ensuring the provision of quality education to all children. Recently, WomenOne focused our efforts on improving quality of education for a small community in rural Haiti. 

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Getting Universal Education Right

by Steven Klees, 

The United Nations recently adopted the Sustainable Development Goals, 17 goals and 169 targets that will guide international development efforts over the next 15 years. The objectives are ambitious; they include efforts to end hunger and poverty, reduce economic inequality, achieve gender equity, combat climate change, promote sustainable development, and improve infrastructure, sanitation, health, and education. And yet, if the efforts covered by this last goal – education – are any guide, it will take more than promises to ensure that the SDGs are achieved.

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“So what about the boys?”  An insight into how a girls’ education program impacts boys

By Obert Chigodora, 

The mentioning of the name of the girls’ education project IGATE in full to stakeholders and communities was always greeted with many interesting questions: “What about boys?”; “Do you want parents to forget about the boy child and focus on the girl child?”   These were some of the questions that were quickly asked by the communities and stakeholders.  Explanations and clarifications about the project’s support to boys’ education were not easily understood. This story provides a detailed account of how IGATE is also benefiting boys’ education with specific reference to the case of Thulani Munkuli, who was assisted by the Mothers Group (MGs) to re-enroll after dropping out of school. 

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Reversing privatization of education: Case study of Rwanda

by Rukabu Andy Benson, 

After the introduction of nine year basic education in 2007 and 12 year basic education by the government of Rwanda in 2010, many of the private schools have lost the majority of their students. Some of them even ended up closing the doors. Private schools leaders blame these two programs as the main cause for their collapse, but the government did not intend to close private schools. Through its efforts of bringing positive changes in public and government aided schools, they are making public schools more affordable to parents and students which has made it difficult for some private schools to compete. 

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The Evidence is Clear: Financing for Education is Inadequate

by A World at School, 

It’s been 15 years since world leaders committed to improving lives of those living in poverty through the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). These goals have been an important point of reference for how far we’ve come, what remains to be done and the existing challenges. International donors also made a commitment that “no countries seriously committed to education for all will be thwarted in their achievement of [universal access] by a lack of resources.” 

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The Nobelity Project - Ten Years of Bridging the Gaps

by Turk Pipkin, Nobelity Project, 

With Education for All as our over-riding goal, The Nobelity Project is celebrating ten years as a non-profit, a decade of telling inspiring stories and working to take inspired actions. With a full-time staff of just two (my co-founder and Executive Director Christy Pipkin and a Program Coordinator), we are constantly searching for avenues with a relatively large impact on both education issues and real-world results.

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Not Just The New Fashion

by Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, 

 ‘Fashion week’ just ended for the global development community, when thousands of international leaders convened in New York for the UN General Assembly (UNGA). Presidents, ministers, donors, UN leaders, and CEOs celebrated the newest designs in global development: stylish poverty reduction plans, glamorous partnerships to prioritize girls’ education, and beautiful spokespeople for the latest hot issues like climate change and child trafficking.

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