Working toward a quality education for all.


Celebrating 5 Years of the Rukmini Journey & 5 Key Lessons Learned

by Priti Bhattarai and Bibhuti Aryal, 

It was 5 years ago that two brothers, Bibhuti and Nabin Aryal, embarked upon what seemed like — at the time — a simple idea. Knowing that a family’s economic condition was one of the key reasons why many girls in rural areas of Nepal were missing out on education, they wanted to help a few families by providing economic support so that money alone does not keep girls out of school. If they could help a few girls this way, they felt it would be a worthwhile cause.

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Giving Girls a Chance in School

by Alice Aluoch, 

In 2012 Mfariji Africa began as a small project distributing sanitary towels to girls in villages and marginalized areas in Kenya to reduce class absenteeism during menstruation. Over time the vision has expanded to improving the lives of Kenyan girls by helping them to stay in school and complete their education though different programs.

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Why We #FundEducation: Meet AGE Africa Scholar, Cecelia

by Claudia Gonzalez, 

At sixteen years old, Cecelia, a young woman from Chiunda Village in Malawi, has already confronted countless barriers to receiving her education.

As early as primary school, Cecelia remembers watching her friends drop out – a fate that is all too common in the country of Malawi, where less than 6% of women hold a high school diploma. Throughout her adolescence, she has seen firsthand the problems of early marriage. One in every two girls nationwide is married or raising children by the age of 18.

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Repairing Broken Men: Engaging Youth in Education in Emergencies

by Kylie Barker, 

Education in emergencies more often than not is focused on building safe places, structure, and strong programs for children working through trauma and grief and without any other options due to overloaded government systems and limited educational resources.

What is lacking, however, is effective programming for teenagers in emergencies. We hear a lot about child-friendly spaces, and see activities taking place for those ages six to twelve, but once they hit their teenage years, the number of programs available drop drastically.

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Rukmini High School Graduates Look To the Future

by Rukmini Foundation, 

In Nepal, the School Leaving Examinations, or SLCs as they are known are a series of tests taken by students completing the 10th grade. Every student that is seeking to become a graduate looks forward to the SLCs with a sense of dread and anxiety. For many this is quite possibly the toughest examination of their life. The mixed emotions of anxiety, hope, and fear is insurmountable – as people believe that the results of this exam can make or break you. It is also known as the "iron gates" of education (and life) not only because it is difficult to pass, but also depending on how well you do can determine how far you go. Parents usually put pressure on their kids to not only pass, but to do better than your cousins, or your friends, or your neighbor’s children.

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Building A Model School:  A Local School is a Point of Pride

By Carol Ann Emquies, Nina Hogan, and Jane Oppenheimer, 

In 2014, President Jakaya Kikwete visited our first project, Ntulya Primary School, deeming it “a model school that should be copied throughout Tanzania."  As we break ground on Milembe Girls Secondary School in nearby Iteja Village, the concept of an efficient, repeatable school drives our plans and execution.  What makes a school model-worthy?  After 8 years and a variety of building projects in rural Tanzania, we have come to learn there are varying essential elements that define what makes a school successful.

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