Promoting quality education for all.

Taking CHARGE through CHATS: A program to reach 12000 girls in secondary school in Malawi

by Kristina Lederer, 

Last September, at the 10th annual Clinton Global Initiative, Advancing Girls’ Education in Africa (AGE Africa) joined a collaboration of 30 civil society organizations, governments, private sector partners, and multilateral organizations in making a historic commitment to improve educational and leadership opportunities for young women and girls. 

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Empowering Girls Through Education: Inspiring Stories from Tanzania

By Dr. Aimée Bessire, 

Only 1 percent of Tanzanian girls complete secondary school. The numbers are not much better for boys, but it is clear that girls have a much harder road to travel to get an education. Girls face great obstacles to their education including unaffordable school fees, families privileging sons education over daughters, expectations of hours of household chores and being responsible for younger siblings, and high dropout rates with pregnancies, to name but a few. It is even more difficult for girls living in rural communities where there are often great distances between schools.

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Taking a broader and more holistic approach to education through tech and local language literacy

by Tara Stafford, 

As the international education community begins to focus a long lens on the Sustainable Development Goals taking shape around secondary education and quality, lifelong learning, with special emphasis on technical and vocational skills, Connect To Learn too is evolving our mission to build upon our work providing girls’ scholarships and ICT tools in remote, resource poor classrooms into one that takes a broader, more holistic approach to education. 

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Why Malawi’s Ban on Child Marriage is a Game-Changer for Girls’ Education Everywhere

by Joyce Mkandawire and Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, 

Malawi banned child marriage last month. The new legislation increasing the legal age of marriage from 15 to 18 is a major victory for girls in Malawi, and a game changer for girls’ education everywhere. 

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The Nobelity Project - Ten Years of Bridging the Gaps

by Turk Pipkin, Nobelity Project, 

With Education for All as our over-riding goal, The Nobelity Project is celebrating ten years as a non-profit, a decade of telling inspiring stories and working to take inspired actions. With a full-time staff of just two (my co-founder and Executive Director Christy Pipkin and a Program Coordinator), we are constantly searching for avenues with a relatively large impact on both education issues and real-world results.

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Getting Adolescent Girls Back in School—A Needs Assessment

By Sofia Mussa, Malwina Maslowska & Kelsey Dalrymple, 

“For her it was just the fees…she feels like if her parents had paid for the fees, she wouldn’t have even gotten pregnant. Because she really wanted to study and complete her course in the Polytechnic, and get herself something to do.”

This is a common experience faced by adolescent mothers in Kenya and South Africa. In Kenya alone, an estimated 13,000 girls leave school every year due to teenage pregnancy

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Investing in People, Not Projects

by Bradley Broder, 

A villager from rural Kenya once said to me that his community needs a rainwater catchment system that would feed water tanks to each house in his village.  When I pressed him as to why he feels this is so vital given that there is a clean water source less than a kilometer away, his response was unequivocal: “because the volunteer before you helped the village down the road to get water tanks.  We want them to!”

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Expanding Educational Opportunities through Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

by Dr. Joanna Rubinstein, 

As development experts know, the pay-back of educating girls is extraordinary. But based on current trends, by 2015, only 56 percent of countries will have achieved gender parity in lower secondary education. And if trends continue at the current pace, the poorest girls in sub-Saharan Africa will not even achieve universal primary school completion until 2086 (UNESCO, 2014).

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Making the Difference with Adolescent Girls

by Claudia Gonzalez, 

The World Bank’s Adolescent Girls Initiative (AGI) was launched in 2008 and seeks to discover what many in international development have wondered, “What works best in programming to help young women succeed in the labor market?” (“The Adolescent Girls,” 2013) The Adolescent Girls Initiative utilizes two different program models, one which emphasizes employment and entrepreneurship via the classroom, and one which emphasizes life skills via girls’ clubs.

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