Promoting quality education for all.

Increasing our Focus on Girls’ Education

by Alan Bobbett, 

A few months ago I met a grandmother. 

That’s not so remarkable, until I tell you that she is only 25. 

No matter how you calculate the math and circumstances that result in a young lady becoming a grandmother at age 25, it is horrific.  There is no instant panacea that will make instances like this history.  In this particular case, I can point to a long civil war, with its attendant atrocities, as well as child marriage, poverty, and other factors as contributory, but I really started the story this way to make the point that in our drive for accurate statistics with which to make decisions, we must never lose sight of the fact that those statistics point to real people, with real stories, and with very real barriers to overcome. 

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Education for people and planet: Creating sustainable futures for all

by Elizabeth Cadwallader, 

Just over a year on from the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its associated 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Brookings Center for Universal Education, the Global Campaign for Education-US and the  Global Education Monitoring Report team hosted the launch of the Global Education Monitoring Report (GEM Report)  and Gender Review. The GEM report – hosted and published by UNESCO – provides an analysis of SDG 4 targets and respective indicators (inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning opportunities) as well as a consideration of the interaction of SDG 4 with all other SDGs on the sustainable development agenda.

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In Celebration of Humanity

by Kylie Barker, 

We love sharing stories of kids like Suhbat, who came to our center and spent time laughing and playing and working through the trauma of being displaced by ISIS through art and character building lessons.

We love talking about Shilan, and how our work was provoking her family to think through issues of respect and forgiveness.

We get excited to share stories about how the teenagers who came to our classes were inspired to study together and felt more confident going into their exam sessions.

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Steps to Achieve SDG4 for Every Last Child

by Coco Lammers, 

This is Masa. When Masa was one year old, her family was forced to flee their home country of Syria for Turkey. Today, Masa is five years old, an age when many children around the world go to school. She is among the 1 million Syrian refugee children living in neighboring countries who are not in school.

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Giving Girls a Chance in School

by Alice Aluoch, 

In 2012 Mfariji Africa began as a small project distributing sanitary towels to girls in villages and marginalized areas in Kenya to reduce class absenteeism during menstruation. Over time the vision has expanded to improving the lives of Kenyan girls by helping them to stay in school and complete their education though different programs.

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Education Cannot Wait

by Jennifer Rigg, 

As a parent of two active children, I see the amazing skills and knowledge they’re gaining at school every day. Yet the vital right to education is just a dream for 75 million children impacted by emergencies and crises. Across our global community, we cannot wait any longer and must act today to reach all children with quality education.

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Repairing Broken Men: Engaging Youth in Education in Emergencies

by Kylie Barker, 

Education in emergencies more often than not is focused on building safe places, structure, and strong programs for children working through trauma and grief and without any other options due to overloaded government systems and limited educational resources.

What is lacking, however, is effective programming for teenagers in emergencies. We hear a lot about child-friendly spaces, and see activities taking place for those ages six to twelve, but once they hit their teenage years, the number of programs available drop drastically.

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Education is a lifesaving humanitarian response

by Mark Engman, 

Education is a human right.  More than that, it is a lifesaving humanitarian response.  School provides stability, structure and routine that children need to cope with loss, fear, stress and violence.  Being in school can keep children safe and protected from risks, including gender-based violence, recruitment into armed groups, child labor, and early marriage.  In periods of crisis, parents and children identify education as one of their highest priority needs.

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Barriers to Education for Girls in Haiti

by WomenOne, 

Despite significant progress made in achieving the second Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education, an estimated 63 million adolescents remain out of school. Barriers to education disproportionately affect girls and include poverty, gender-based violence, child marriage, and pregnancy. WomenOne and the Global Campaign for Education-US (GCE-US) are dedicated to ensuring the provision of quality education to all children. Recently, WomenOne focused our efforts on improving quality of education for a small community in rural Haiti. 

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