Promoting quality education for all.

Not Just The New Fashion

by Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, 

 ‘Fashion week’ just ended for the global development community, when thousands of international leaders convened in New York for the UN General Assembly (UNGA). Presidents, ministers, donors, UN leaders, and CEOs celebrated the newest designs in global development: stylish poverty reduction plans, glamorous partnerships to prioritize girls’ education, and beautiful spokespeople for the latest hot issues like climate change and child trafficking.

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A Difficult Journey for Education: Village Life in Nepal

by Nabin Aryal, 

Every Spring, our foundation welcomes a new group of girls to become Rukmini Scholars. Our mentors, program officer, selection committee members and other volunteers visit villages surrounding the Pharping area (Pharping is roughly 20 KM South of Kathmandu, Nepal) to identify girls whose families may be facing hardships in trying to continue their schooling.

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Ending Child Slavery…All Together Now!

by Jill Christianson, 

On a sunny day late in September, I tagged along on a lobbying visit to the Brazilian Embassy in Washington – led by Kailash Satyarthi, with colleagues from the Child Labor Coalition and the International Labor Rights Forum.  Following this fall’s swirl of activities at the UN General Assembly and a myriad of meetings about the Beyond-2015 plans (Sustainable Development Goals) including education, Kailash is focused on one thing…ENDING CHILD SLAVERY.

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Investing in People, Not Projects

by Bradley Broder, 

A villager from rural Kenya once said to me that his community needs a rainwater catchment system that would feed water tanks to each house in his village.  When I pressed him as to why he feels this is so vital given that there is a clean water source less than a kilometer away, his response was unequivocal: “because the volunteer before you helped the village down the road to get water tanks.  We want them to!”

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Standing for a Safe World Where Women and Girls Achieve Anything Without Fear

by Lindsay Morris, 

Imagine this.  A young girl sits in a dusty Cairo police station with her mother and two officers.  She is hesitant as she gathers the courage to tell her story but, as she begins, she paints herself as a superhero; rather than a victim of kidnapping and sexual assault, she becomes a powerful figure who defeats her hateful nemesis.  Though she can neither read nor write, Yasmin wields her voice and holds the officers’ rapt attention as she tells her harrowing story throughout the afternoon.  

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#firstdays4all

As millions of students return and have returned to school over these past few weeks and months, 127 million did not. 127 million children of primary and lower secondary school age were not greeted at the door by their new teacher, did not greet old friends and meet new ones, did not crowd in to the school yard, did not spend the morning finding their shiny new desks, learning new rules and finding their way as they transition from primary to secondary school.

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The importance of details, and well-rooted ones, at that

by Jinny St. Goar, 

Our small organization is focused largely on one locality in southwestern Mali in the villages of Djangoula that are found within the commune of Benkadi Founiya just south of the regional administrative center, Kita. Roughly five kilometers from the dirt road that ends in the county seat of Founiya, these villages were simply too remote for their youngest children to benefit from the early years of education.

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Education for All: What’s advocacy got to do with it?

by Emily Teitsworth, 

Why are we failing to deliver on the promise of educating girls? In rural areas in Nigeria, surveys have found that at the end of 3rd grade, only 6 percent of students are able to read a simple sentence. In Malawi, it is illegal for pregnant girls and young mothers to return to school. In Guatemala, only 10 percent of rural girls complete secondary education.

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What are you #StrongerThan?

I have always gotten a kick out of doing something that someone said I couldn’t do or that I am not supposed to do—finishing a grueling hike, building something, fixing something or even something as seemingly simple as getting up each and every day and going back to finish something you started even if everyone is against you. All of that takes strength—the strength to do, the strength to overcome and the strength to keep going.

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New UNICEF/UNESCO Reports Reveal Stalled Progress in Africa

by Mark Engman, 

Every year, June 16 is the Day of the African Child.  It commemorates the thousands of courageous children in Soweto, South Africa, who in 1976 marched to protest apartheid and to demand equal education. The march ended in violence: – hundreds of youth were wounded or killed.  Their legacy continues to build a better future for African children.

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