Promoting quality education for all.

On Civil Society and Girls Forced to Marry…

by Jill Christianson , 

This year’s United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW59) marks the 20th anniversary of the landmark Beijing Platform for Action which laid out a roadmap for progress for girls and women worldwide. I’ve just returned from the United Nations where I was a part of the Education International delegation to the 59th UN Commission on the Status of Women (UNCS59). Our Education International delegation at the UN included 20 educators from 12 nations – we were present to advocate on behalf of women educators and girls in the USCSW59 and Beyond-2015 agenda.

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Getting Adolescent Girls Back in School—A Needs Assessment

By Sofia Mussa, Malwina Maslowska & Kelsey Dalrymple, 

“For her it was just the fees…she feels like if her parents had paid for the fees, she wouldn’t have even gotten pregnant. Because she really wanted to study and complete her course in the Polytechnic, and get herself something to do.”

This is a common experience faced by adolescent mothers in Kenya and South Africa. In Kenya alone, an estimated 13,000 girls leave school every year due to teenage pregnancy

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Not Just The New Fashion

by Dr. Denise Raquel Dunning, 

 ‘Fashion week’ just ended for the global development community, when thousands of international leaders convened in New York for the UN General Assembly (UNGA). Presidents, ministers, donors, UN leaders, and CEOs celebrated the newest designs in global development: stylish poverty reduction plans, glamorous partnerships to prioritize girls’ education, and beautiful spokespeople for the latest hot issues like climate change and child trafficking.

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Standing for a Safe World Where Women and Girls Achieve Anything Without Fear

by Lindsay Morris, 

Imagine this.  A young girl sits in a dusty Cairo police station with her mother and two officers.  She is hesitant as she gathers the courage to tell her story but, as she begins, she paints herself as a superhero; rather than a victim of kidnapping and sexual assault, she becomes a powerful figure who defeats her hateful nemesis.  Though she can neither read nor write, Yasmin wields her voice and holds the officers’ rapt attention as she tells her harrowing story throughout the afternoon.  

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Access to Education and Hope: The Solukhumbu Girls Hostel

by Sarah Andrews, 

Growing up in her remote Nepalese village, located deep within the Solukhumbu (Everest) Region, Ngaki faced many hardships common among girls in Nepal who endeavor to go to school. The rural location of her village combined with the realities of her day-to-day life led Ngaki to wonder and worry about her future. She often doubted that it was possible for a girl in her circumstance to get an education.

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Critical Dialogues and Empowering Education in the Wake of the Rape Tragedy in India

Urvashi Sahni, 

The unspeakable horror of the brutal gang rape and murder of a 23-year-old girl in the capital of the world's largest democracy, India, on December 16th has brought to the forefront the cruel, fatal, highly discriminatory gender norms prevalent in a country that now claims to be one of the worlds rising economic stars. A window has opened for responses that challenge these gender norms through critical dialogues and empowering education.

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Milk vs Soda

Many of us saw the moment in the documentary Half the Sky, based on the book by Nick Kristoff and Sheryl WuDunn when Olivia Wilde asked as she walked through city streets in Kenya: "Who buys the soda?" The answer was men--women buy the milk and men buy the soda. This struck me, and I believe it tells the story of women and their impact on the world all on its own. It is estimated that when girls get an education, as women, they invest 90 percent of the income they earn back into their families-men invest 30-40 percent. UNESCO has found that each extra year of schooling that a girl receives boosts her future income by 10-20 percent (15-25 percent if the extra year is in secondary). This makes a strong case for girls' education as a tool for development.

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