Promoting quality education for all.

Two Years Later: Model Classrooms in Rural Nepal

Lisa Lyons, 
Two Years Later: Model Classrooms in Rural Nepal

The 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Nepal on April 25, 2015 and subsequent 7.2-magnitude “aftershock” on May 12th destroyed or badly damaged every building in Educate the Children’s project area. Over the following years, ETC designed and constructed two-classroom buildings at some of the 29 schools with which we had already been working before the earthquakes so that children can get back to achieving a successful and safe education in Nepal.

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Bidil’s mission to ensure all children in his Ethiopian village have the chance to learn

by Alastair Stewart, 

Bidil Abdulahi has experienced joy and heartbreak in his attempt to send his children to school.

Every day, Bidil Abdulahi would farewell his oldest son, sent off on a one hour walk to the nearest school. “It was a long walk for a child,” he says, “but I didn’t want my child to be as illiterate as I am.”

The decision paid off, with his son Yunus now in college.

Bidil’s daughter was not as fortunate.

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Afghanistan’s Uphill Battle for Girls’ Education

by Devon O’Reilly, 

The theme of this year’s 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign was ‘make education safe for all.’ Over the course of the 16 days, Women Thrive Alliance shared the work – campaigns, capacity building techniques, and achievements – of our Alliance members that work relentlessly on gender-based violence that restricts girls from getting an education. Unfortunately, in many instances, female genital mutilation, forced marriage, and rape were the common culprits preventing a girl from continuing her education. In the case of Afghanistan, however, a girl’s mere chance of being allowed any education at all was the baseline.

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Training Teachers in Conflict Zones – using education for hope

by Shanyn Ronis, 

In times of crisis, there are always people running towards the problem – not away from it. These are the people who inspire hope  in others. And that hope, in turn, is terror’s greatest enemy. This has never been more relevant than today, as the world faces down the largest refugee crisis since World War II, with more than 51 million refugees displaced from their homes by terror attacks and political strife.

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Free from violence: Children advocate for safe schools

by Janella Nelson, 

As many children return to school this month, it is an exciting time for parents and students. There is an assumption by many that school is a safe place, but there are children around the world, including in the U.S., that will be returning to school and wondering if their school is really safe. 

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Taking CHARGE through CHATS: A program to reach 12000 girls in secondary school in Malawi

by Kristina Lederer, 

Last September, at the 10th annual Clinton Global Initiative, Advancing Girls’ Education in Africa (AGE Africa) joined a collaboration of 30 civil society organizations, governments, private sector partners, and multilateral organizations in making a historic commitment to improve educational and leadership opportunities for young women and girls. 

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My vision for girls’ education in Africa: Safety in Schools

by Fatty Al Ansar, 

When I think of girls’ education in Africa, I dream of a continent where women and men are treated equally. I long for a continent where women are equal contributors to society; a continent where girls receive the same opportunities as their male counterparts so they can tap into their inherent potential. I would love to see every single girl have access to a free, quality education in Africa. 

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Empowering Girls Through Education: Inspiring Stories from Tanzania

By Dr. Aimée Bessire, 

Only 1 percent of Tanzanian girls complete secondary school. The numbers are not much better for boys, but it is clear that girls have a much harder road to travel to get an education. Girls face great obstacles to their education including unaffordable school fees, families privileging sons education over daughters, expectations of hours of household chores and being responsible for younger siblings, and high dropout rates with pregnancies, to name but a few. It is even more difficult for girls living in rural communities where there are often great distances between schools.

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