Promoting quality education for all.

Realigning Our Priorities – A Focus on Early Childhood

by Molly Curtiss, 

The problem is not just the amount of funding for education, but how the available resources are being spent. In the past decade, tertiary education consistently received the highest proportion of education aid of any education sector, beating out even primary education year after year. Moreover, during this period, seven of the top fifteen donors to education increased the portion of their aid allocated to higher education and consequently decreased the portion to basic education.

Further, this aid to tertiary education isn’t being spent sustainably. A large percentage of growing funds to higher education have been used not to strengthen university systems in recipient countries but rather to provide scholarships for students to attend higher education institutions in donor countries. In 2012, for example, “for every US$1 disbursed in direct aid to early childhood care and education, the equivalent of US$58 went to support students from recipient countries at the post-secondary level in donor countries.”

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Repairing Broken Men: Engaging Youth in Education in Emergencies

by Kylie Barker, 

Education in emergencies more often than not is focused on building safe places, structure, and strong programs for children working through trauma and grief and without any other options due to overloaded government systems and limited educational resources.

What is lacking, however, is effective programming for teenagers in emergencies. We hear a lot about child-friendly spaces, and see activities taking place for those ages six to twelve, but once they hit their teenage years, the number of programs available drop drastically.

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Rukmini High School Graduates Look To the Future

by Rukmini Foundation, 

In Nepal, the School Leaving Examinations, or SLCs as they are known are a series of tests taken by students completing the 10th grade. Every student that is seeking to become a graduate looks forward to the SLCs with a sense of dread and anxiety. For many this is quite possibly the toughest examination of their life. The mixed emotions of anxiety, hope, and fear is insurmountable – as people believe that the results of this exam can make or break you. It is also known as the "iron gates" of education (and life) not only because it is difficult to pass, but also depending on how well you do can determine how far you go. Parents usually put pressure on their kids to not only pass, but to do better than your cousins, or your friends, or your neighbor’s children.

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Fund education to achieve accessible literacy for all

by Katherine Stephans, 

Can you remember your first day of kindergarten? Or even preschool? Chances are, you were excited beyond words. 

Chances are, your first classroom greeted you with colorful drawings on the walls, 27 letters on the chalkboard, and even a cozy reading corner filled with stacks of books, waiting patiently to take you on an adventure. 

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Education is a lifesaving humanitarian response

by Mark Engman, 

Education is a human right.  More than that, it is a lifesaving humanitarian response.  School provides stability, structure and routine that children need to cope with loss, fear, stress and violence.  Being in school can keep children safe and protected from risks, including gender-based violence, recruitment into armed groups, child labor, and early marriage.  In periods of crisis, parents and children identify education as one of their highest priority needs.

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