Promoting quality education for all.

Landline Schools: Balancing Innovations in Educational Quality and Access

by Bradley Broder , 

The remote Kenyan village I called home from 1999-2001 had just one reliable phone line located in a Catholic Church.  The Priest there allowed me to accept incoming calls from my parents in New York every other Sunday at 7 p.m.  If I missed that call, which happened on occasion, two long weeks would pass before that phone would ring again. 

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Giving Girls a Chance in School

by Alice Aluoch, 

In 2012 Mfariji Africa began as a small project distributing sanitary towels to girls in villages and marginalized areas in Kenya to reduce class absenteeism during menstruation. Over time the vision has expanded to improving the lives of Kenyan girls by helping them to stay in school and complete their education though different programs.

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Active Learning for a Global Education

by Reshma Patel, 

In 2009, Impact Network began building schools in rural Zambia to bring educational access to some 57 million children who were out of school. Two years later, we handed over 5 newly built schools to the local communities to operate. But as the school year unfolded, we saw that while we had left a structure for the community, we had provided no teachers, no management structure, and essentially no tools to help provide a quality education.

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Education Cannot Wait

by Jennifer Rigg, 

As a parent of two active children, I see the amazing skills and knowledge they’re gaining at school every day. Yet the vital right to education is just a dream for 75 million children impacted by emergencies and crises. Across our global community, we cannot wait any longer and must act today to reach all children with quality education.

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Global Education’s Changed Reality, Community, and Governance - The Role of Education Diplomacy

by Yvette G. Murphy, 

While setting the stage for the topic of this blog post, Education Governance, I considered the frequent use of the terms “sunset” and “new era” to describe the transition away from the MDGs and the undertaking of the 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals. I wondered what exactly we are leaving behind in the sunset and what exactly has changed in this new era. 

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One Year Later: Why It’s Especially Important to #FundEducation After a Disaster

by Lisa Lyons, 

In April and May 2015, two earthquakes of magnitudes 7.8 and 7.2 respectively devastated much of Nepal. The sudden loss of family members and homes shattered countless people’s lives. The sudden loss of thousands of schools, while understandably not people’s immediate focus of concern, made itself felt as the weeks passed and the desire to get “back to normal” strengthened.

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Why We #FundEducation: Meet AGE Africa Scholar, Cecelia

by Claudia Gonzalez, 

At sixteen years old, Cecelia, a young woman from Chiunda Village in Malawi, has already confronted countless barriers to receiving her education.

As early as primary school, Cecelia remembers watching her friends drop out – a fate that is all too common in the country of Malawi, where less than 6% of women hold a high school diploma. Throughout her adolescence, she has seen firsthand the problems of early marriage. One in every two girls nationwide is married or raising children by the age of 18.

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Realigning Our Priorities – A Focus on Early Childhood

by Molly Curtiss, 

The problem is not just the amount of funding for education, but how the available resources are being spent. In the past decade, tertiary education consistently received the highest proportion of education aid of any education sector, beating out even primary education year after year. Moreover, during this period, seven of the top fifteen donors to education increased the portion of their aid allocated to higher education and consequently decreased the portion to basic education.

Further, this aid to tertiary education isn’t being spent sustainably. A large percentage of growing funds to higher education have been used not to strengthen university systems in recipient countries but rather to provide scholarships for students to attend higher education institutions in donor countries. In 2012, for example, “for every US$1 disbursed in direct aid to early childhood care and education, the equivalent of US$58 went to support students from recipient countries at the post-secondary level in donor countries.”

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Repairing Broken Men: Engaging Youth in Education in Emergencies

by Kylie Barker, 

Education in emergencies more often than not is focused on building safe places, structure, and strong programs for children working through trauma and grief and without any other options due to overloaded government systems and limited educational resources.

What is lacking, however, is effective programming for teenagers in emergencies. We hear a lot about child-friendly spaces, and see activities taking place for those ages six to twelve, but once they hit their teenage years, the number of programs available drop drastically.

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